RETRONAUT'S TUMBLR

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1937: Under the heel of the Statue of Liberty
“Oswald E. Camp, who is superintendent of the statue for the National Parks Service, is 6 feet 1 and ½ inches tall, but appears dwarfed by contrast with Liberty’s right foot, which measures 11 feet between the back edge of the upraised heel and the surface on which the foot rests,” read the notes accompanying this August 1937 photo in the National Geographic archives.
“When the statue was displayed in Paris before being shipped to America, the copper plates of the sole were left off and the opening was used as the entrance to the statue.”
Source
1937: Under the heel of the Statue of Liberty
“Oswald E. Camp, who is superintendent of the statue for the National Parks Service, is 6 feet 1 and ½ inches tall, but appears dwarfed by contrast with Liberty’s right foot, which measures 11 feet between the back edge of the upraised heel and the surface on which the foot rests,” read the notes accompanying this August 1937 photo in the National Geographic archives.
“When the statue was displayed in Paris before being shipped to America, the copper plates of the sole were left off and the opening was used as the entrance to the statue.”
Source

1937: Under the heel of the Statue of Liberty

“Oswald E. Camp, who is superintendent of the statue for the National Parks Service, is 6 feet 1 and ½ inches tall, but appears dwarfed by contrast with Liberty’s right foot, which measures 11 feet between the back edge of the upraised heel and the surface on which the foot rests,” read the notes accompanying this August 1937 photo in the National Geographic archives.

“When the statue was displayed in Paris before being shipped to America, the copper plates of the sole were left off and the opening was used as the entrance to the statue.”

Source

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1911: “First Fashion Shoot”
The Spring collection from the then hugely famous Paul Poiret was published by the French magazine “Art et Decoration” in an article called L’Art de la Robe (The Art of Dress). The collection significantly included these photographs by a young and then unknown Edward Steichen whose models posed in a more naturalistic style – a break away from the traditional clothes mannequin.
Source
1911: “First Fashion Shoot”
The Spring collection from the then hugely famous Paul Poiret was published by the French magazine “Art et Decoration” in an article called L’Art de la Robe (The Art of Dress). The collection significantly included these photographs by a young and then unknown Edward Steichen whose models posed in a more naturalistic style – a break away from the traditional clothes mannequin.
Source

1911: “First Fashion Shoot”

The Spring collection from the then hugely famous Paul Poiret was published by the French magazine “Art et Decoration” in an article called L’Art de la Robe (The Art of Dress). The collection significantly included these photographs by a young and then unknown Edward Steichen whose models posed in a more naturalistic style – a break away from the traditional clothes mannequin.

Source